The Yellow Farmhouse Garden

February 23, 2016

Community garden great alternative for those who don’t have room

Filed under: Garden Preparation — bob @ 10:37 am

I’m fortunate to have a fair sized plot of land to do as much gardening as I want. But there are a lot of gardeners who used to have space but now live in a place where there is no where to plant a garden. And there are plenty of others who have never gardened before and long for a plot of soil to start gardening.

More and more community gardens are popping up all over to meet this need.  They are being started by churches, cities, towns, parks and rec departments other community groups.

Most community gardens offer individual plots. It’s a place where you stake out your claim and no one else is allowed on your spot unless you say so. ¬†That means plot boundries are clearly marked so no one encroaches on someone else’s area Some community gardens are communal meaning everyone pitches in and work one big plot of land and all share equally. That however takes a special group of people to successfully pull that one off.

Almost all community gardens charge a fee to help defray costs such as springtime tilling of the soil. In addition to land, most gardens provide access to a water source — although the most rugged ones may not. Sometimes compost and mulch is available for gardeners to use. You’re most likely to see that in gardens sponsored by city parks departments that collect large volumes of leaves in the fall.

Generally the larger the fee, the more amenities provided.

It's quiet now but soon be buzzing at St. Mary Organic Farm community garden.

It’s quiet now but soon be buzzing at St. Mary Organic Farm community garden.

Now’s the time to start searching for a community garden near you. Plots are normally rented out on a first come first served basis. Often plots are gone well before the gardening season starts. Early March would not be too soon to reserve your spot. Thankfully, the internet makes it fairly easy to find a community garden. Local MSU Extension Offices are a good place to start too.

Community gardens are especially good for beginning gardeners because they are places where experienced gardeners are most likely to hang out and a novice can find a mentor.

If you know of a community garden who has room for more participants, let us know in the comment section.

Bob

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